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Here's How Plants Can Make You Happier and Healthier

Updated: Jun 25

Did you know that plants can actually make you happier – and healthier? It’s true! It may seem unbelievable at first, but the research is all there: plants can make you feel better in more ways than one. Let’s take a closer look at how plants can improve your mind and body.



1. Plants clean the air in your home

Plants play a pretty important role in your home that goes beyond making it look nice: they purify your air!


Plants do the opposite of what we do when we breathe – they take in carbon dioxide and convert it into oxygen. Most plants do this during the day, but some plants – like Crispy Wave, Sansevieria, Areca Palm, and Aloe Vera – release oxygen into the air at night, making them the perfect plants to have in your bedroom while you sleep.


Also, these plants can help remove all sorts of toxins from the air, including pollutants, chemicals, smoke, odors, and much more. These toxins can cause plenty of health troubles, including breathing troubles, disease related to smoke, and more.



2. Plants help boost productivity

Who doesn't need to increase their productivity?

Studies in the workplace have shown that having a plant in offices helps people become more productive.


You can reap these benefits at work or home by placing some plants strategically in areas where you do the most work.


For example, if you need to get more productive in the kitchen in order to get your meal prep done every week, add some plants to your kitchen window and you'll find yourself working harder in the kitchen than ever before!



4. Plants promote relaxation and de-stressing

Time and time again, studies have shown that plants can help you relax and de-stress.


Anxiety, stress, frustration – they can take a toll on your mental and physical state, so you should do anything you can to help reduce them.


Looking at plants and caring for them are all ways that can promote more relaxation and less stress in your life.



5. Plants increase humidity in your home

Did you know that having the right amount of humidity in your home is beneficial to your health?


If your home is too dry, it can cause problems such as dry throat, sore throat, dry skin, and even snoring! Higher humidity in your home can help reduce these types of problems.


Plants growing at home will increase the humidity in the air, which in turn benefits your health by removing the problems associated with low humidity.



6. Plants improve creativity and provide inspiration

Have you ever looked at a flower and felt the urge to draw it? Or write a poem about it?


Plants (flowering or otherwise) have been a source of creativity and inspiration since human history began, and modern life is certainly no exception in the trend for seeing plants and flowers as creative inspiration.


Also, plants can help clear your mind when you need to focus by creating a positive workspace. Think about it: when you can't concentrate, it's all about the way your environment is decorated.


If you need to get creative, surrounding yourself with the beauty of nature (even inside your home) can help get those creative juices flowing.



7. Plants can cover up unpleasant odors

Let's face it: all homes have an unpleasant odor now and again.

Maybe your dirty dishes have piled up, and the smell is less than pleasant, or garbage has a tendency to sink at the end of the week. In either case, there is one thing that can cover up the smell naturally: flowering plants!


Flowering plants that have scent-heavy blossoms can make your home smell lovely without the need for artificial chemical sprays that 1) don't last very long and 2) don't smell as nice as something naturally sweet like flowers.



8. Plants can reduce certain types of health problems or symptoms

If you are experiencing certain types of health problems, such as throat irritation from pollutants in the air, then plants can be used to reduce these symptoms.


The reduction of certain health problems can be a lifesaver for people that suffer from coughing, dry throat, or other symptoms related to irritants found in the air. Houseplants can reduce coughs by up to 37 percent, and lower tiredness by up to 30 percent. Indoor plants can also help with dizziness, nasal congestion, headaches, and skin symptoms.



9. Plants can help with the winter blues

Winter blues can hit hard, especially if you live in an area where everything seems to turn grey and lifeless during the harsher winter months.


Having plants growing inside your home can help you feel less stressed with the winter weather.


For best results, opt for blooming plants and plants that have vibrant colors; these will bring the bright nature you need inside your home.



10. Plants can make you feel happier overall

Research has shown time and time again that plants make you happier in a broader sense. Having plants around you improves your mood, and can even improve your actual health.

An indoor jungle will add life and joy to your house. Plants can create a pleasant, soothing vibe and improve the perception of your home place. Your house will feel warmer, and you will start feeling more comfortable and connected to your space.


Surrounding yourself with plants will also cause a calming effect on your mind and emotions.

This happens because there is a connection in our minds between plants and taking a break in nature, which generates a positive influence.


Last but not least, taking care of houseplants is a calming ritual that can give you a purpose: there is nothing more rewarding than seeing your plant that grows and thrives!


If you want your life to be happier overall, pick out some nice indoor plants and start keeping them inside today. If this is your first time growing plants indoors, don’t fret: there are plenty of plants that require very little fuss and can grow for just about anyone who knows how to use a watering can.



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